How to Make Jam

  • Jam Making
  • Introduction

    Mmm...sweet fruity goodness. Yes, please! This unassuming preserve is found in many textures and flavours all over the world. Homemade jam has a simple charm and long shelf-life which makes it a great staple to keep in your pantry or fridge - and also a great gift. Here, we’ll offer 2 simple jam-making techniques so you can choose the way that’s best for you.

    *Please check out the “Tips” section below for additional advice.

     1. Large pot - 16 to 20 quarts

    2. Canner - special pot to sterilise jars after filling (Not needed in method 2)

    3. Jar lifter - tongs with non-slip grip to remove sterilised jars from hot water (Not needed in method 2)

    4. Preserving jars + lids + rings

    5. Canning jar funnel - channels jam into jar, less mess!

    6. Food mill - used for creating seedless jams

    1 - Standard Method

    INGREDIENTS

    6 cups fruit - fresh or frozen
    8 tablespoons pectin
    4 cups granulated sugar
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    A splash or dash of flavourings of your choice (e.g. aniseed, ginger, cardamom, brandy, etc.

    DIRECTIONS

    1. Sterilise the jars and lids.

    • Put them in the dishwasher and leave it in to dry
    • Wash them with hot soapy water, remove the rubber seal, then boil jars + lids in hot water for 10 minutes before drying in the oven at 100℃/225℉/gas ¼ for 30 minutes.

    2. Wash the fruit. Remove dirt and impurities by washing with water. Also remove stems, hulls and pits when necessary. For seedless jams, put the mushed fruit through a food mill.

    3. Add sugar (and flavouring of your choice) and mush the fruit with fork, spoon or potato masher. This releases its natural pectins, which help with thickening. The fewer the lumps, the smoother the jam.

    4. Mix your fruit / berries with the lemon juice and pectin. Simmer at medium-high heat until it comes to a full boil - approx. 5 minutes. Stir occasionally.

    5. Warm lids in hot (not boiling) water bath.

    7. Skim excess foam if necessary.

    8. Fill the hot dry jars with the jam till ¼” from the top. Wipe away spilled jam, place dried lid on top, then screw on metal ring.

    9. Using jar lifter tongs, submerge closed jars into canner, half-filled with boiling water for 5 - 10 minutes. There should be roughly 2 inches of water above the jars.

    10. Lift jars out of hot water and let cool. Test the seal by pressing the middle of the metal lid. If you hear a ‘pop' the seal is not tight - consider refrigerating those jars or reheat the jam, re-jar the jam and re-boil the closed jar.

    11. After cooling, label the jars and store in pantry.

    2 - Quick / Budget “Refrigerator” Method

    INGREDIENTS

    6 cups fruit - fresh or frozen
    4 cups granulated sugar
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    A splash or dash of flavourings of your choice (e.g. cinnamon, vanilla, lemon zest, etc.

    DIRECTIONS

    1. Wash jars, then set in the oven at 100℃/225℉/gas ¼ to dry for 30 minutes. Jars should be kept hot until filled. This prevents breaking due to drastic temperature changes when filling with hot jam.

    2. Wash the fruit! Remove dirt and impurities by washing with water. Also remove stems, hulls and pits when necessary. For seedless jams, put the mushed fruit through a Foley food mill.

    3. Add sugar (and flavouring of your choice) and mush the fruit with fork or potato masher. This releases its natural pectins, which help with thickening. The fewer the lumps, the smoother the jam. Simmer at medium-high heat until it comes to a full boil - approx. 5 minutes. Stir occasionally.

    4. Skim excess foam if necessary.

    5. Test jam thickness. Take a half spoonful of jam and cool till room temperature. Touch or taste to see it desired consistency is obtained.

    6. Fill the dry jars with the jam till ¼” from the top. Wipe away spilled jam, place lid on top, then screw on metal ring. Cool and refrigerate.

    Tips

    Properly sealed “canned” jams taste best up until 6 - 8 months but are safe for consumption for about a year. (Method 1)

    “Refrigerator jam” lasts for about 1 month. (Method 2)

    Jars should be kept hot until filled. This prevents breaking due to drastic temperature changes when filling with hot jam.

    Riper fruit contain lower pectin amounts, so if you don’t want to add additional pectin it’s easier to make jam with fruit that are not fully mature.

    For a cosy home-made effect, cut squares of cloth with dimensions roughly 3 inches larger than the jar lid diameter. Place a square atop the cooled jars and fix in place with a string or elastic band. Tie on a hanging label, cinnamon stick or decorative ornament for an added touch.

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